Category Archives: Rumi

10 Beautiful Quotes To Quiet Your Mind

“Can the perceiver itself be perceived?”

– Mooji

 

“Truth is not a reward for good behaviour, nor a prize for passing some tests. It cannot be brought about. It is the primary, the unborn, the ancient source of all that is. You are eligible because you are. You need not merit truth. It is your own….Stand still, be quiet.”

– Nisargadatta Maharaj

 

“What you are looking for, is where you are looking from.”

– St Francis of Assissi

 

“It’s one of the great wonders of life. What will it be like to go to sleep and never wake up? If you think long enough about that it will pose the next question to you. What was it like to wake up after having never gone to sleep?”

– Alan Watts

 

“God, or your essential nature, is not something. Not content. Not form.”

– Eckhart Tolle

 

“Once we admit our existence, how is it that we do not know the self?”

– Ramana Maharshi

 

“Care about what others think and you will always be their prisoner.”

– Lao Tzu

 

“There’s no sunlight in my brain, whose interior remains as dark as a limestone cavern no matter how bright it is outside.”

– Deepak Chopra

 

“You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection.”

– Buddha

 

“I have lived on the lip of insanity, wanting to know reasons, knocking on a door. It opens. I’ve been knocking from the inside.”

– Rumi

Now it’s your turn! Please add any quotes in the comment section that always help to quiet your mind.

What if we all answered the question “How are you?” honestly?

On Oprah’s website there is a story by Elisabeth Lesser about what Rumi called The Open Secret. Below I have included page 2 of the three page article. Please click on the link to see the rest.

The Persian poet Jelalluddin Rumi wrote poems so alive and clear that even today—eight centuries later—they shimmer with freshness. Their wisdom and humor are timeless; whenever I have an a-ha moment with one of Rumi’s poems, I feel connected to the people throughout the ages who have climbed out of their confusion on the rungs of Rumi’s words.

In several of his poems and commentaries, Rumi speaks of the Open Secret. He says that each one of us is trying to hide a secret—not a big, bad secret, but a more subtle and pervasive one. It’s the kind of secret that people in the streets of Istanbul kept from each other in the 13th century, when Rumi was writing his poetry. And it’s the same kind of secret that you and I keep from each other every day. You meet an old acquaintance, and she asks, “How are you?” You say, “Fine!” She asks, “How are the kids?” You say, “Oh, they’re great.” “The job?” “Just fine. I’ve been there five years now.”

Then, you ask that person, “How are you?” She says, “Fine!” You ask, “Your new house?” “I love it.” “The new town?” “We’re all settling in.”

It’s a perfectly innocent exchange of ordinary banter; each one of us has a similar kind every day. But it is probably not an accurate representation of our actual lives. We don’t want to say that one of the kids is failing in school, or that our work often feels meaningless, or that the move to the new town may have been a colossal mistake. It’s almost as if we are embarrassed by our most human traits. We tell ourselves that we don’t have time to go into the gory details with everyone we meet; we don’t know each other well enough; we don’t want to appear sad, or confused, or weak, or self-absorbed. Better to keep under wraps our neurotic and nutty sides (not to mention our darker urges and shameful desires.) Why wallow publicly in the underbelly of our day-to-day stuff? Why wave the dirty laundry about, when all she asked was, “How are you?”

I Am That I Am

Who Am I?

Who am I indeed. Who is it that could ask such a circular question? Better yet, who could ask it and not know the answer? What details about the “who” is the asker expecting to learn?

And don’t details sound an awful lot like content. Content being all that you are not as almost any rookie seeker may have read. The old saying “The devil is in the details” certainly takes on a whole new meaning.

It can only be the mind that asks for more information, more facts, and more guidance. Any ever-present, unchanging, observing self can have only a very limited interest in the question, who am I.

“I am that I am” as God said to Moses.

However, through this inquiry the seeker learns that the question itself has become another obstacle. Another quest of the mind on the journey to absolution. To continue to ask it is to remain trapped in your head.

Therefore the question must burn itself up. Forever it must remain unanswered, at least in the conventional sense. “Call Off The Search” as the title of Papaji’s documentary instructs.

It is better to keep quiet than for the mind to keep busy with questions. “Silence is the language of God” as Rumi famously said.